How To Repair
  2006 Massey Ferguson GC2310 Tractor Loader Backhoe

© 2016 Brian Mork


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Introduction

This web page contains a narrative log and pictorial essay to maintain a 900 hour 2006 Massey Ferguson GC2310 Tractor with a 22.5 hp 3-cylinder Iseki L3 1.1L (69 in3) diesel engine. This page is meant to document technical data, and motivate and encourage you as you try to fix your tractor. I have other pages about my 230,000 mile 1994 Suburu Legacy with 2.2L. and 100,000 mile 2003 VW Jetta wagon 1.9L diesel, and 160,000 mile Dodge B250 van.  I appreciate your link back to this page so Google thinks what I say is important.

Because the Model GC2310 comes standard with a backhoe and front loader instead of 3-point hitch, you'll also hear it called "TLB" for "Tractor Loader Backhoe".  The PTO, 3-point lifters, and tow-ball mount plate are all there, just covered by the backhoe.  Mine also has two hydraulic loops installed after market - the rear loop is controlled by a baby joystick to the left of the seat and the front loop is controlled by a click button switch on the bucket joystick. Lastly, mine came with an operator cab to keep the operator more comfortable if operating in cold / wet conditions.

March 2016 - Buying Manuals

The first problem I worked after purchasing the tractor wasn't really a problem.  I just wanted owner, parts, and maintenance books.  AGCO (who purchased an owns the Massey Ferguson line) has an AGCO on-line parts manual (login as guest to view books), so there's really no reason to buy the paper parts manual.

I ordered 4 paper books, which immediately highlighted the fact that there is a serial number break in the GC2310 series.  They refer to it as "N 25201", which means any tractor with that serial number or after has a different parts catalog and a different operating manual.  To interpet that serial number, you have to add the common letters.  "JNA 25201" is what you would find on your tractor.  The tractor serial number is behind your left heel; don't confuse that with the frame serial number or engine serial number.  My serial number is JRAxxxx, and because R comes after N, I have the later model.  An easy way to tell the difference is that the newer serial numbers have a tachometer around the hour-meter.

Here are the paper book part numbers for a GC2310 with a serial number JNA25201 or later.  Check the AGCO parts web info if you want ot confirm - be sure to choose the English lanuage if that is what you want.  If you order from AGCO, you can get DVD versions for a few dollars cheaper with noticeably less shipping cost.

Operating Manual - 1449927M1,  $17
Service Manual - tractor 4283003M1,  $29
Service Manual - engine 4283035M2,  $17
Parts Manual - 65179M92,  $28


April 2016 - Fluids

After researching different options, here's what I purchased to change expendables.  These are alternatives to the AGCO filter part numbers.  I like to do this up front so I know the service intervals start from zero.

Oil Filter - FRAM PH4967/4767, NAPA 1360, WIX 51360
Engine Oil - Shell Rotella T semi-synthetic 15W-40 (white bottle)
Hydraulic Filter screw-on - AGCO 4265229M91 (no alternative found yet, $29)
Transmission and accessories hydraulic fluid - Coastal Multi-Trac in the green 5-gal bucket, $46
Front axle fluid - same as transmission hydraulic fluid
Fuel filter - FRAM C7516 $15, NAPA 3262, WIX 33262
Air filter - NAPA 9691, WIX 49691
Engine coolant - commerical 50:50 mix from car parts store


May 2016 - Replace Axle Steering Spindle Oil Seal

I checked in the front axle fill cap on the left side and the internal gearing looked wetted with oil, but there was no standing oil.  It's suppose to be filled up 1/2 the height of the axle, so I added fluid.  Within a day, it had leaked out the right steering spindle onto the garage floor, so I knew that the seal needed to be replaced (part number 4265156M91, $31).

Others have documented replacing the seal for a MF 1553 and MF GC2300.


Right-Click (dual-click on a Mac) any picture to see a full-size view or download.

front-right-axle
Overall work area.  Right front tire removed. You can use the bucket to lift the tractor and then put a jack stand under the frame. Final gear housing hydraulic fluid is draining out.
opening wheel gear housing
With all the bolts loose, split the gear cover away from the main housing. I gently chiseled around the entire seam to break the silicone seal, but later realized there are notches at the seam on the left and right side (just out of this picture) to push in a screwdriver to wedge them apart.
inside final gear housing
Looking inside the final gear housing. The central bearing comes out with the gear.  Look carefully on top of the other little gear and you can see the snap ring. After 870 hours of operation, there was silt collected along the bottom of the cavity. Two pins support and allign the cover.
final wheel gear
Final wheel gear with more silt collected along the bottom edge (left of photo).  Clean out silt and clean the mating surface, but otherwise, there is no need to do anything with these parts.
removing 90 degree gear housingYou may be able to replace a spindle oil seal without removing the 90 degree angle housing.  However, 4 bolts and an O-ring seal is pretty easy to take apart and put together. I slips off the spline shaft easily once the four bolts are removed and the tie-rod tape bolt is separated.
inner seal of 90 degree gear housing
Top of the 90 degree gear housing. I cleaned 10 years and 870 hours of crud off the metal surface and cleaned out the o-ring. 4 bolt holes and 2 alignment pin holes.
axle side of 90 degree gear housing
Drive shaft extending out ward.  It's loose; I left it sitting there.  Notice the bad tie rod ball I smeared some grease into.  I ended up replacing these, too.
spindle shaft separated
Unseat the snap ring by the gear and the final gear housing drops off the spindle.  You can see the oil seal sleeve on the spindle (shiney reflected part).
spindle receiver gasket removal
To remove the inner seal, I cut the metal band with a cold chisel and pried it inward toward the center.  Be careful not to damage the metal surface of the shaft housing.
seal removed, spindle axel cleaned
After removing the inner seal, I cleaned the 90 degree and final housing and bearings with copious amounts of solvent.
removing seal collar
The oil seal has two parts. This shows removal of the collar sleeve, which was a tight rusty fit. Lots of prying with a screwdriver around and around.
mounting new seal collar
I installed the new collar by lubricating and carefully tapping around and around the shaft with a block of wood and re-applied vaseline to lubricate the seal.
seating the inner seal
The inner seal needs to be set below the surface of the metal, so I used a flat faced punch that was sized to not crush the rubber flange. I went around about 4-5 times before it was set all the way.

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In order to work on the front axle, you need the wheels off the ground.  You can use the bucket to lift up the front of the tractor and then put a jack stand under the frame near the front axle.  Use a 19mm socket to remove the wheel studs and remove the wheel.

To open up the final gear housing, I worked a chisel around and around the silicon seal.  If you look carefully there are notches on the left and right side in order to catch a screwdriver blade and pry open the seal.   Also remove the outer tie-rod taper bolt so the final wheel housing can come totally off the tractor. 
Look in the housing just above the small gear.  You can see the snap ring that must be strentched open and removed from its notch.  My snap ring pliers spread the ring barely far enough.  The final gear housing will drop away from the shaft.

You could replace the seal without removing the 90 degree gear housing.  It depends on the seal sleeve installed on the upper part of the shaft.  If it's really stuck or rusted into position, you'll want to be able to work around all sides of it and that is way easier if the 90 gear housing is not connected to the tractor.  Remove the 90 degree housing if you want.

The rubber seal is a 2-piece thing.  You have to remove one piece from inside the lower piece.  You have to remove the collar from the outside of the upper piece.   Mine were very tightly installed and I needed to use a chisel to break the metal part of the oil seal before pushing / sliding / twisting them to remove them.  After removed, clean everything up with solvent and confirm you haven't damaged the shaft or bearing housing.

Putting the new seal in place involves lubricating it and pushing, pressing, or gently tapping it them into position.  Re-lubricate the seal and put the gear housing back up onto the spindle.  Hold it in position while re-installing the snap ring. 

To reconnect the final gear cover, I scraped off all the old silicone rubber, filed off one little blemish, and touched up the entire surface with emery cloth.   I cleaned everything with gasoline and then rinsed the surface with acetone to remove any oily residue.  I applied silicone rubber as a gasket and re-assembled it.

I measured the bolts as 9 mm in diameter.  The service manual identifies torques for only 8 mm or 10 mm bolts.  I used the high end of 8 mm as my target and torqued everything to 20 ft lbs.  If you pulled off the 90 degree gear housing, there is no way to get a torque wrench on the bolt heads.  I used a 1' long open end box wrench and pulled the wrench with a 20' fish scale in order to get 20 ft lb of torque.

I put hydraulic fluid into the right gear housing through the top bolt hole in case there was an air bubble trap somewhere, and then added more in the left axle fill cap up to a half-filled axle.  Side note - after about a day of work, I noticed the left spindle was starting to seep oil out.  Uggh.. I think I need to go replace the other seal, too.  I think the right leak was keeping the fluid level low enough to not affect the left side, but with the right side fixed, the fluid level stays high enough to make the left leak visible.  I will have to order another seal and repeat in the near future.

May 2016 - Replace Steering Rod Ends

The right steering rod end had no rubber boot on the inner ball joint and the ball and joint were totally rusted and very loose.  The left one was badly cracked and the inner ball joint was rusty and loose. I wondered if I could operate the tractor this way until one of the ball joints just popped out.  For a car, this would be bad because the toe-in would wander around and it would probably make bad rattling noises when on the road and would probably wear out the front tires really quickly.  However, a tractor is bouncing around on uneven loose surface most of its life so I'm not sure the tires would ever know the difference.

tie rod pictureEventually, I decided to buy new ball joints so as to not let little maintenance items build up.  Turns out you can't buy just the inner ball joint any more.  That part has been superceded by another part, which has been superceded by another part.  The final part (7069209M91, $73) is an aggregate kit that includes everything outboard of steering rod out to the tie rod tapered bolt.  It does not include the big flat washer where the rod end screws into the hydraulic piston and it does not include a lock washer or castle nut for the tapered bolt.

Spoiler alert: the cotter pins and 10mm-1.25 castle bolts on the tapered bolt were very rusty. I ended up having to get new of both.  The hardware store sold a package of 100+ miscellaneous cotter pins that notably did not have the one size I needed (3/32" diameter an inch or longer), so I drove back and bought the package of the exact size.  The castle bolt was made out of a normal grade (hardness) nut by cutting slots with a cutoff wheel grinder.  I will have to watch these and see if the nuts are too soft, or loosen.

When removing the tie rod, if the taper bolt is stuck tight, consider using an air chisel.  No! don't hit any tractor part with an air chisel.  Back the bolt off until it's flush with the end of the bolt.  Then use a thick aluminum bar or plate between the nut and bolt and the air chisel.  The softer aluminum takes the hammer blows and transfers the impacts to loosen the bolt without damaging the bolt or nut.  This method has reliably removed tie rod end bolts in every vehicle I've tried it with.

The tie rod ends screw into the ends of the hydraulic actuating rod, separated with a large flat washer that prevents the tie rod from crushing in against the oil seal when the steering wheel is turned hard left or right.  In order to screw / unscrew these connections you have to be able to grab the rod ends and the rods with a wrench and turn about 20 ft lbs.  The flat sections provided to do this are very narrow, so I had to grind down my tools to make them fit.   Two "special" tools are required:

A narrow 19 mm open end box wrench for the flats on the stainless steel hydraulic drive rod.  A wrench of this size was not economically available alone, so I picked up an entire set of metric wrenches for $9 from Harbor Freight.  I'm not sure their tools are hard or accurate enough for regular commercial use, but for an open end box wrench that will get ground down and used once every 3 years, I appreciated the lower price.

A narrow 28 mm open end box wrench for flats on the tie rod ends.  I could not find a 28 mm wrench for sale other than in a $50 kits, so I used a 10" crescent wrench, which opened jaws just enough to fit.  I picked up a $6 version from Harbor Freight because I had to grind down the width of the jaws to fit onto the narrow flats of the tie rod ends, and didn't want to grind on my main shop tools.

Because there was no rubber left on the old rod ends, I could use a fat-jaw pipe wrench to take them apart. Turning in opposite directions, one would let loose first.  Luckily the left one came off first, exposing the flats on the end of the stainless rod.  I did not have to grind down the thickness of my 19 mm wrench.  To unscrew the right tie rod, I used a pipe wrench while holding the stainless rod on the other end with the 19 mm wrench.

To re-install the tie rod ends into the stainless steel rod, I couldn't use a pipe wrench because it would have crushed the rubber seal.  Instead, I used the narrow-jaw cresent wrench to fit over the tie rod ends without interfering with the big flat washer.  I put the right rod end on first using the stock 19 mm wrench.  To install the left one, I had to use the narrow 19 mm open end box wrench to not interfere with the big flat washer. I pushed what felt like about 20 pounds on the end of my approximately 1 foot long wrenchs.

I put the taper bolt castle nut back on to 20 flt lbs with a torque wrench and then backed off only enough to slip a cotter pin through the first available nut slot.

I preset toe-in by counting tie rod end thread grooves on the old rod ends.  Mine had 3-1/2 threads exposed on each side.  After putting the tires back on the tracter, I checked alignment for the spec'd 2-6 mm of toe in (front of tires closer together than the rear of the tires).  Nothing fancy, just a tape measure held against the tire surface at mid-axle height measured between two 2x4 sections held against the outside of the tires (someone helped me on the other side of the tractor).  I found about 1 mm of toe in with weight off the front wheels.  I will check and adjust again after the hardware has settled for a week or so.

What to do with your tractor

Here are a few projects I've used the tractor for.

© 2016 Brian Mork. Please contact me using the copyright link prior to commercial use, or reproducing for distribution in a commercial context.